Today we’re talking about future food & eating crickets.

Enjoy below on YouTube (video), or listen on your favourite podcasting app iTunes (apple podcasts), Anchor or Spotify.

As the world’s population soars toward a 2050 expectation of 10 billion people, one of the biggest questions on my mind is how on earth are we going to feed everyone. 

Space will be a luxury, agricultural space may not even be a reality especially those methods which carry a heavy ecological footprint such as large-scale inorganic animal farming, or genetically modified crops (which we know do not withstand the natural adaptive qualities of the earth.) 

The question has remained perplexing especially from a protein standpoint. Plant-based nutrition can be grown indoors, in people’s homes, in urban farming production facilities where environmental control is possible, however it might be a stretch to think that cows, sheep & kangaroos would fair well grazing the living room carpet. So what do we do? 

Well, there may be an answer. A category of animal protein not considered seriously for the past few hundred years. It’s incredibly nutritious, vastly more sustainable and arguably much more ethical allowing the animals to almost reach their full life capacity before harvesting. I’m talking about insects, and in particular on this episode, crickets. 

Crickets contain a whopping 80% protein, all essential amino acids, significant amounts of B12, Calcium & Iron & a plethora of other bioavailable nutrition. According to a recent study they also promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut and reduce levels of inflammatory markers in the blood. 

Crickets seem to be an ecological miracle food; comparing the sustainability of beef production Vs cricket production is astonishing. If we produce 30g of both, Beef requires 38x more space to do so, 23x more water, 12x more food and 1815x more greenhouse gas emissions. 

But all this may be irrelevant if people simply won’t eat insects. Hopefully this isn’t the case. With the rise in alternative nutrition led by companies pioneering insect production, interest is bound to grow. 

But I know, you’re all asking, how do they taste? Could I really eat crickets? That question, too, is answered in today’s episode. 

Today I’m joined by Lucas Becker from cricket company Grilo Protein.

Thanks for tuning in folks remember to support the show by subscribing to the channel here on YouTube or on your favourite podcasting app. Let me know in the comments below what else you’d like to see on The Broccoli Roast & I’ll see you next time.